The electromagnetic force as a sex toy

So, a short time ago, I posted about a body modification that involves implanting tiny but powerful magnets in the fingertips to give someone the ability to feel magnetic and electrical fields. As infinitely cool as this is, the downside is that the NdFeB magets used for the first handful of experiments along these lines tend to cause infection, as the body tends to corrode and destroy them.

I was talking about how amazingly cool the idea of a direct electromagnetic sense is with an old buddy of mine yesterday morning, and he pointed me to a site called Amazing Magnets. Amazing Magnets sells tiny NdFeB magnets that you can buy in lots of 100 for $5.

Now, these magnets can’t be implanted without Very Bad Things happening. However, my friend had a brilliant flash of insight: perhaps something like a cruder version of the magnetic sense could be had by taking these magnets and embedding them in a second skin of liquid latex.

And, of course, that started my thought process down the road to perversion.

Leaving aside the idea of a new sense for a moment, it seems like it might be fun to place magnets all along someone’s back, or chest, or thighs, or breasts, then cover that person in liquid latex and have some fun. A degausser or a bulk tape eraser passed a few inches over the subject’s body might produce some very…interesting sensations. Especially for a person who is blindfolded, bound, or both.

And S has some liquid latex.

I think I’m going to buy a bunch of these magnets.

46 thoughts on “The electromagnetic force as a sex toy

  1. I’m surprised that they are not using the neodynium magnets that are coated in gold. Gold, if I remember correctly, is more chemically inert and the body tends to have less problem with it.

    • The implanted magnets are gold plated, but the gold plating is too thin to act as an effective biological buffer. What they’ve discovered is that during the ordinary course of using your hands, you put enough pressure on your fingers to breach the silicone covering they used in the first tests, and from that point, it doesn’t take very long for the gold to be breached as well, and your body tends to dissolve the magnet, leading to cysts and infection. A more durable coating of some sort is necessary before the magnets can be implanted safely.

  2. I’m surprised that they are not using the neodynium magnets that are coated in gold. Gold, if I remember correctly, is more chemically inert and the body tends to have less problem with it.

    • Apparently, the implants are small enough they aren’t picked up by metal detectors (though I bet the person with the implants can FEEL the metal detectors, which is kinda cool…)

  3. neat!

    now that makes me wonder about the little magnets my housemate is always coming home with stuck to acupressure points (those use some sort of padless bandaids to hold them in place).

    also: i had the impression that the high density of nerve endings in fingertips was critical to the original bodymod. i recall seeing a presentation on haptic interfaces for wearable computers that talked about the very wide separation needed between touches on e.g. the back (or even the arm) for a person to be able to distinguish them.

    but i guess if the magnets are really cheap you can get around that just by using lots of them…

    maybe i should borrow a bunch of my housemate’s discarded magnets and tape them somewhere and see how they feel in my office. the 3-gauss line from the mri coil next door extends through the wall here…

  4. neat!

    now that makes me wonder about the little magnets my housemate is always coming home with stuck to acupressure points (those use some sort of padless bandaids to hold them in place).

    also: i had the impression that the high density of nerve endings in fingertips was critical to the original bodymod. i recall seeing a presentation on haptic interfaces for wearable computers that talked about the very wide separation needed between touches on e.g. the back (or even the arm) for a person to be able to distinguish them.

    but i guess if the magnets are really cheap you can get around that just by using lots of them…

    maybe i should borrow a bunch of my housemate’s discarded magnets and tape them somewhere and see how they feel in my office. the 3-gauss line from the mri coil next door extends through the wall here…

  5. The implanted magnets are gold plated, but the gold plating is too thin to act as an effective biological buffer. What they’ve discovered is that during the ordinary course of using your hands, you put enough pressure on your fingers to breach the silicone covering they used in the first tests, and from that point, it doesn’t take very long for the gold to be breached as well, and your body tends to dissolve the magnet, leading to cysts and infection. A more durable coating of some sort is necessary before the magnets can be implanted safely.

  6. Apparently, the implants are small enough they aren’t picked up by metal detectors (though I bet the person with the implants can FEEL the metal detectors, which is kinda cool…)

  7. Oooh! That’s a really good idea!

    Probably won’t do much with a piezo speaker–they don’t work on magnetism–but a large speaker might be a very, very interesting play toy. That’s a great idea!

  8. I just got a new heavy duty magnet welding “third hand” for use in sewing. It’s shaped like a “pointing arrow” and cost about $11. I’ll bet it would be the magnet dujour if you were to cast a bunch of these in silicon and make it an insertable…. πŸ™‚ My evil mind at work

  9. I just got a new heavy duty magnet welding “third hand” for use in sewing. It’s shaped like a “pointing arrow” and cost about $11. I’ll bet it would be the magnet dujour if you were to cast a bunch of these in silicon and make it an insertable…. πŸ™‚ My evil mind at work

  10. Because it is an alternating field, you don’t actually need magnetic material. A good conductor like aluminium will do, as the eddy currents induced in the metal will then cause it to react and vibrate in the magnetic field too.

  11. Because it is an alternating field, you don’t actually need magnetic material. A good conductor like aluminium will do, as the eddy currents induced in the metal will then cause it to react and vibrate in the magnetic field too.

  12. Hello.

    I stumbled over your LJ when bouncing around and read this and thought “Oooooo, now that’s an idea.”

    Mind if I add you? You seem articulate and interesting. (And I have some thoughts on your next public post after this one.)

  13. Hello.

    I stumbled over your LJ when bouncing around and read this and thought “Oooooo, now that’s an idea.”

    Mind if I add you? You seem articulate and interesting. (And I have some thoughts on your next public post after this one.)

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