How to Tie a Simple Shinju (breast harness)

Note: This is part 3 of an occasional ongoing “how to” series on rope bondage.
Part 1 of the series, How to Tie a Rope Harness Part I, is here.
Part 2 of the series, How to Tie a Frog Tie, is here.
As you might well imagine, none of these posts is even remotely work-safe.

In Japanese bondage (or “shibari”), a breast harness is called a “shinju.” A shinju can be applied to just about any woman, though most shinju harnesses don’t work well on men.

The style of shinju shown here is very simple, and easy to learn. More complex harnesses may have several layers of rope that cross the breasts directly, or vertical sections that are designed to press on and stimulate the nipples. This simple shinju can be used as a starting point for you to explore more complex forms of breast bondage, or can be tied beneath the karada demonstrated earlier.

So, without further ado, on to the tutorial!

 
  Making a Simple Shinju

The shinju shown here can be made in only a few minutes. Many people prefer relatively short (20′) lengths of rope for making a shinju; the rope I’m using here is longer than that, though it makes little difference. As with the karada, I prefer using longer pieces of rope with a shinju because I can then integrate the extra rope into other kinds of ties, such as arm ties.
As with a karada, you’ll start your shinju by locating the middle of the rope. Place your finger on your partner’s spine at about the level of the bottom of her breasts, hold the center of the rope there, and then pass it around your partner’s torso. When you come all the way around, put the ends of the rope through the loop, then bring one side up over each shoulder, as these pictures show:

How to make a shinju
When you’ve done this, you’ll have a piece of rope going around your partner just below the breasts, and two pieces of rope anging over her shoulders, as the first part of the picture below illustrates. Run the two ends of the rope beneath the part of the rope passing under her breasts, then bring them up over her shoulders again, like so:

At this point, you’ll have two pieces of rope hanging down your partner’s back. Take them both in your hand. Put your finger on your partner’s spine, at a level just above the top of her breasts, and pull both pieces of rope together around her body above her breasts, like you see in the first picture here. Loop both pieces of rope through the loop you made with your finger; it’ll make sense when you do it, I promise.
Now you’re almost finished. Take the two pieces of rope that are hanging down, and pass them under the lower piece of rope that goes around your partner’s torso. Then just wrap the ends of the rope around and around, like you did with the karada.

When you’re done, the shinju should look like this from the front:

There are all sorts of things you can do from this point, especially if you’re using a 20′ or 25′ length of rope rather than a shorter length.
For example, you can use the ends of the rope hanging down your partner’s back to tie her arms behind her back, which will cause your partner to arch her back and display her breasts quite nicely. Or, if you like, rather than wrapping the ends of the rope around the lower of the two parts going around her torso, wrap the ends of the rope around both the upper and lower parts around her torso. This causes the upper and lower rope to squeeze together, stimulating the breasts.
You can bring a third wrap around the center of her breasts, directly across the nipples, which will constantly stimulate her nipples, especially whenever she moves.
When you bind your partner’s breasts in a shinju, you can then tie the back of the shinju to a fixed upright object such as a post, which will hold her in place and allow you to caress, stimulate, or even flog her breasts. (If you flog the breasts of a person bound in this way, be aware that the rope will prevent the breasts from moving the way they would if she wasn’t bound, so you should take care to do so more gently than you would otherwise.)
The shinju can be used as a foundation, with a karada tied over it. or the upper parts of the arms can be bound to the two ropes that pass around the person’s torso, holding the arms at the side. Experiment, and you’ll find all kinds of variations that start with this basic tie.
 
 

91 thoughts on “How to Tie a Simple Shinju (breast harness)

  1. I’ve found that doing something like this once pretty much is enough to commit it to memory; the same basic ideas are used throughout a lot of rope bondage, so you tend to see the same sorts of things cropping up again and again. 🙂

  2. I’ve found that doing something like this once pretty much is enough to commit it to memory; the same basic ideas are used throughout a lot of rope bondage, so you tend to see the same sorts of things cropping up again and again. 🙂

  3. After Tacit taught me this the first time, I knew it well enough to teach it to several co-workers … ‘s karada is now making the rounds through the Orlando rigging community

    • You must have some interesting co-workers. I have a big grin on my face imagining our workplace populated by kinksters. That would be a hoot.
      I’ve added this post (Tacit’s original one) to my memories, so I hope he doesn’t take it down before the “time is right.”

      • I work in an interesting industry. Most people wouldn’t consider themselves “kinky” because they have a pre-determined idea of what kinky is supposed to be and they don’t fit their “stereotype”, but the reality is they all practice some form of BDSM or another, whether they acknowledge it or not. The real interesting part about my co-workers is that we are all out and outspoken at work about sex and relationships and dating … quite different from any other industry I’ve ever worked in.

        As for him taking it down … I still see posts from years before, and this is basically a draft of a tutorial that will go on his symtoys site, so it’ll be up somehow, some way, for a long time to come!

  4. After Tacit taught me this the first time, I knew it well enough to teach it to several co-workers … ‘s karada is now making the rounds through the Orlando rigging community

  5. You must have some interesting co-workers. I have a big grin on my face imagining our workplace populated by kinksters. That would be a hoot.
    I’ve added this post (Tacit’s original one) to my memories, so I hope he doesn’t take it down before the “time is right.”

  6. I work in an interesting industry. Most people wouldn’t consider themselves “kinky” because they have a pre-determined idea of what kinky is supposed to be and they don’t fit their “stereotype”, but the reality is they all practice some form of BDSM or another, whether they acknowledge it or not. The real interesting part about my co-workers is that we are all out and outspoken at work about sex and relationships and dating … quite different from any other industry I’ve ever worked in.

    As for him taking it down … I still see posts from years before, and this is basically a draft of a tutorial that will go on his symtoys site, so it’ll be up somehow, some way, for a long time to come!

  7. That looks strange to me..

    (From Seswu/MyDungeonSpace.com, about the Shinju tutorial)

    I’ve seen a couple of breast bondages, and nearly all of them finish off the wrappings around the breasts first, and goes over the shoulders only after that. Then, if the arms were included, the security wrappings.

    Your shinju goes breastwrapping, then the shoulders, and then the other breastwrapping.
    Is there a particular advantage to this since you do it this way, and do you know if it would be problematic to use for suspensions?

    • Re: That looks strange to me..

      Six of one, half a dozen of the other, I think. I tend to do the tie “backward” because I find it’s easier to do (and I have developed a highly efficient form of laziness). I haven’t ever tried this design with suspension, though, so I can’t speak to how well it’d work.

  8. That looks strange to me..

    (From Seswu/MyDungeonSpace.com, about the Shinju tutorial)

    I’ve seen a couple of breast bondages, and nearly all of them finish off the wrappings around the breasts first, and goes over the shoulders only after that. Then, if the arms were included, the security wrappings.

    Your shinju goes breastwrapping, then the shoulders, and then the other breastwrapping.
    Is there a particular advantage to this since you do it this way, and do you know if it would be problematic to use for suspensions?

  9. Re: That looks strange to me..

    Six of one, half a dozen of the other, I think. I tend to do the tie “backward” because I find it’s easier to do (and I have developed a highly efficient form of laziness). I haven’t ever tried this design with suspension, though, so I can’t speak to how well it’d work.

    • Re: help

      Yep! In fact, it’s quite common in shibari to layer different types of tie all at once. Use a small piece of rope for the shinju, then tie a karada over top of that, and then add a frog tie or other form of tie if you like.

  10. Re: help

    Yep! In fact, it’s quite common in shibari to layer different types of tie all at once. Use a small piece of rope for the shinju, then tie a karada over top of that, and then add a frog tie or other form of tie if you like.

  11. Confused about last steps…

    “Loop both pieces of rope through the loop you made with your finger; it’ll make sense when you do it, I promise.”

    For me it does not make sense unfortunately. I do not have a ‘live person’ to try it on ATM and only short ropes, so I’m practicing on smaller ‘chest-formed’ objects… do you put the ends in the triangle where your finger is pointing, or inside the other triangle just below?

    • Re: Confused about last steps…

      Yep, you take both ends and just pass them under and then through the place where the rope is looped around your finger, so that the ends of the rope take the place of your finger. Does that help?

      • Re: Confused about last steps…

        Yes, after reading this, I looked at the pictures again and I think I understand it now. Thanks! B)

  12. Confused about last steps…

    “Loop both pieces of rope through the loop you made with your finger; it’ll make sense when you do it, I promise.”

    For me it does not make sense unfortunately. I do not have a ‘live person’ to try it on ATM and only short ropes, so I’m practicing on smaller ‘chest-formed’ objects… do you put the ends in the triangle where your finger is pointing, or inside the other triangle just below?

  13. Re: Confused about last steps…

    Yep, you take both ends and just pass them under and then through the place where the rope is looped around your finger, so that the ends of the rope take the place of your finger. Does that help?

  14. Re: Confused about last steps…

    Yes, after reading this, I looked at the pictures again and I think I understand it now. Thanks! B)

  15. I suspect that you & I are approximately of an age, as far as when we started using computers if not chronilogically, so I think it’s a hoot how we differ in basic attitudes/tastes. For example, my first job using computerized equipment (in 1981) involved learning on-the-job (i.e., they lost the manual) how to keyboard newspaper copy along with all font & formatting codes, & save the file to real floppy disks. Then I walked the floppy disks & jewel cases of font disks & a canister containing photographic paper over to another building, where I used a more-sophisticated set-up to expose the formatted copy onto the roll of photo paper. When the machine read a change-of-font code in the file everything stopped, & I opened the top of the processing unit & changed out the font disk. It was a gas, especially huddling in the paper-supply closet in complete darkness when I needed to load a new roll of photo paper. 😉

    Oh, & I loved using my brother-in-law’s Trash-80, when he let me touch it. I worked with computerized equipment & then actual computers for another 7-8 years before I could actually afford one myself. So, not surprisingly, I’m still heavily fixated on text, with a minor attraction to spreadsheets & very basic object-oriented graphics programs (they let me place the pretty text more conveniently ;-). Tho’ I haven’t been able to work with them often or own one myself in over 15 years, I imprinted on the Apple/Mac GUI early on & prefer it.

    In other words, I’m perfectly happy being on the trailing edge of technology. I still have an alarm clock with those flip panels (which I love) & a VCR with turn dials & in/out switches. I choose a mobile phone for what’s cheap & gets decent voice reception & has the fewest buttons on the outside of the case–I’m always hitting them by mistake as I grasp the phone & try to open or use it. I adore reading your posts (primarily because I enjoy good prose & the organized, lucid, snarky way you write) but it’ll a good long time before I pay to get a gadget that does most of these things, if I ever do.

    Oh, except text. I like texting! Words rule. 😀

  16. I suspect that you & I are approximately of an age, as far as when we started using computers if not chronilogically, so I think it’s a hoot how we differ in basic attitudes/tastes. For example, my first job using computerized equipment (in 1981) involved learning on-the-job (i.e., they lost the manual) how to keyboard newspaper copy along with all font & formatting codes, & save the file to real floppy disks. Then I walked the floppy disks & jewel cases of font disks & a canister containing photographic paper over to another building, where I used a more-sophisticated set-up to expose the formatted copy onto the roll of photo paper. When the machine read a change-of-font code in the file everything stopped, & I opened the top of the processing unit & changed out the font disk. It was a gas, especially huddling in the paper-supply closet in complete darkness when I needed to load a new roll of photo paper. 😉

    Oh, & I loved using my brother-in-law’s Trash-80, when he let me touch it. I worked with computerized equipment & then actual computers for another 7-8 years before I could actually afford one myself. So, not surprisingly, I’m still heavily fixated on text, with a minor attraction to spreadsheets & very basic object-oriented graphics programs (they let me place the pretty text more conveniently ;-). Tho’ I haven’t been able to work with them often or own one myself in over 15 years, I imprinted on the Apple/Mac GUI early on & prefer it.

    In other words, I’m perfectly happy being on the trailing edge of technology. I still have an alarm clock with those flip panels (which I love) & a VCR with turn dials & in/out switches. I choose a mobile phone for what’s cheap & gets decent voice reception & has the fewest buttons on the outside of the case–I’m always hitting them by mistake as I grasp the phone & try to open or use it. I adore reading your posts (primarily because I enjoy good prose & the organized, lucid, snarky way you write) but it’ll a good long time before I pay to get a gadget that does most of these things, if I ever do.

    Oh, except text. I like texting! Words rule. 😀

  17. Good stuff. I’ve been considering returning to WordPress and will take this on board.

    Also: his blog sounds interesting; do be sure to sound the all clear!

  18. Good stuff. I’ve been considering returning to WordPress and will take this on board.

    Also: his blog sounds interesting; do be sure to sound the all clear!

  19. Curious to know…

    “Or, any violent religion other than those which are culturally endorsed, in any event.”

    How many violent religions have we culturally endorsed, so far?

  20. Curious to know…

    “Or, any violent religion other than those which are culturally endorsed, in any event.”

    How many violent religions have we culturally endorsed, so far?

  21. Bravo.

    Put up a page on Finely Tuned Mac about this and you’re likely to get boinged. Not sure if you *want* that, but it’s the sort of thing that amuses them…

  22. Bravo.

    Put up a page on Finely Tuned Mac about this and you’re likely to get boinged. Not sure if you *want* that, but it’s the sort of thing that amuses them…

  23. i thought that was pretty much what their cease-and-desist letter said. i was mentally giving them props for being honest about it…

  24. i thought that was pretty much what their cease-and-desist letter said. i was mentally giving them props for being honest about it…

  25. Of course, you realize this means that performing scientific research could cause literally anything, from nose warts to the sun going out, and we could never determine this scientifically because we can’t construct a control group. (Any control group we attempt to create is part of scientific research and therefore is not a valid control group for an experiment measuring the effects of scientific research.)

  26. Of course, you realize this means that performing scientific research could cause literally anything, from nose warts to the sun going out, and we could never determine this scientifically because we can’t construct a control group. (Any control group we attempt to create is part of scientific research and therefore is not a valid control group for an experiment measuring the effects of scientific research.)

  27. Yup!

    Relevant links:

    http://xkcd.com/882/

    http://yudkowsky.net/rational/bayes

    Also, I can’t believe they didn’t teach me this in the first year sciences – they just threw journal articles at me and were like “oh, we’ll explain p later”. Good little primer.

    As for GMOs, I just realized how much of a misnomer GMO is since we’ve been modifying genes since we’ve been selecting for them. Anywho, there are people worried about the impact on themselves as individuals, but more people are worried about the implications: human cloning and genetic modification. Good little primer (though slightly out of date): http://books.google.ca/books/about/The_ethics_of_human_cloning.html?id=3rx6uDgm8lYC&redir_esc=y

  28. Yup!

    Relevant links:

    http://xkcd.com/882/

    http://yudkowsky.net/rational/bayes

    Also, I can’t believe they didn’t teach me this in the first year sciences – they just threw journal articles at me and were like “oh, we’ll explain p later”. Good little primer.

    As for GMOs, I just realized how much of a misnomer GMO is since we’ve been modifying genes since we’ve been selecting for them. Anywho, there are people worried about the impact on themselves as individuals, but more people are worried about the implications: human cloning and genetic modification. Good little primer (though slightly out of date): http://books.google.ca/books/about/The_ethics_of_human_cloning.html?id=3rx6uDgm8lYC&redir_esc=y

  29. Wow. Everyone in the future is a hot model with cool gadgetry. Businesses try to sell others on the viability of growing stuff on the wall, supposedly since buildings of the future won’t need windows (which is, coming from Microsoft, more than ironic).

    And none of that gadgetry does a damned thing different than the stuff we have now. Inspiring.

    /sarcasm

  30. Wow. Everyone in the future is a hot model with cool gadgetry. Businesses try to sell others on the viability of growing stuff on the wall, supposedly since buildings of the future won’t need windows (which is, coming from Microsoft, more than ironic).

    And none of that gadgetry does a damned thing different than the stuff we have now. Inspiring.

    /sarcasm

  31. I challenge you to find me anyone who actually, seriously argues that artists don’t deserve to be compensated for their work. That’s a strawman version of the critique of intellectual property.

    Anyone who is genuinely arguing for the end of intellectual property and isn’t completely clueless about everything is making that argument in the context of advocating the transformation of the entire economy into some sort of post-scarcity model (which socialists have been doing for a couple of centuries now). It doesn’t matter that artists can’t be compensated in such a system, because the very idea of “compensation” no longer needs to exist and everyone—including the artists—is perfectly capable of taking all that they need from the system whenever.

    Even among people who don’t get as radical as that, the point being made isn’t that artists shouldn’t get compensated; it’s just that technology is changing in ways that make it inevitable that they eventually won’t be, just because of competition. In other words, that information has become post-scarcity while the rest of the economy has not, and that incongruity will make it increasingly difficult for anyone working in the information sector to translate that work into reward in the non-information sector. And anyone seriously thinking about that acknowledges that this is a problem and that we need to come up with some innovative way of ensuring artists get compensated, but many simply point out that the current industry-favored approach of imposing artificial scarcity on information with DRM and such is an unworkable solution with too many negative side-effects.

    No one denies that there are complicated issues going on here which need some kind of solution that rewards artists. And trying to reduce the entire discussion down to “entitlement” is a strawman that erases a long history of thought on how trade and reward in post-scarcity and post-capitalist economies might work.

  32. I challenge you to find me anyone who actually, seriously argues that artists don’t deserve to be compensated for their work. That’s a strawman version of the critique of intellectual property.

    Anyone who is genuinely arguing for the end of intellectual property and isn’t completely clueless about everything is making that argument in the context of advocating the transformation of the entire economy into some sort of post-scarcity model (which socialists have been doing for a couple of centuries now). It doesn’t matter that artists can’t be compensated in such a system, because the very idea of “compensation” no longer needs to exist and everyone—including the artists—is perfectly capable of taking all that they need from the system whenever.

    Even among people who don’t get as radical as that, the point being made isn’t that artists shouldn’t get compensated; it’s just that technology is changing in ways that make it inevitable that they eventually won’t be, just because of competition. In other words, that information has become post-scarcity while the rest of the economy has not, and that incongruity will make it increasingly difficult for anyone working in the information sector to translate that work into reward in the non-information sector. And anyone seriously thinking about that acknowledges that this is a problem and that we need to come up with some innovative way of ensuring artists get compensated, but many simply point out that the current industry-favored approach of imposing artificial scarcity on information with DRM and such is an unworkable solution with too many negative side-effects.

    No one denies that there are complicated issues going on here which need some kind of solution that rewards artists. And trying to reduce the entire discussion down to “entitlement” is a strawman that erases a long history of thought on how trade and reward in post-scarcity and post-capitalist economies might work.

  33. FOOD is actually a bone of contention. Our current agricultural system rewards farmers very poorly (any but the biggest often subsidize their farms with a day job) but the obvious answer– consumers paying enough for food that it can be grown and processed with those workers paid a reasonable wage –is very difficult to bring to the table.

    See: tomato picking, mexican agriculture, migrant farm workers, meat packing

  34. FOOD is actually a bone of contention. Our current agricultural system rewards farmers very poorly (any but the biggest often subsidize their farms with a day job) but the obvious answer– consumers paying enough for food that it can be grown and processed with those workers paid a reasonable wage –is very difficult to bring to the table.

    See: tomato picking, mexican agriculture, migrant farm workers, meat packing

  35. Re: STD testing as a safe sex method?

    “Okay, you are just completely misunderstanding me…”

    I don’t think so. That is to say, I understand what you are saying (and it all sounds very exciting, I’m sure), I’m just refusing to allow you to attribute its genesis to me, or its relation to what I’ve written.

    If you prefer, think of it this way:

    Given: “I tend to be fairly literal…” to describe your approach to this thread, how do you LITERALLY interpret the following statements:

    “I suspect you are misinterpreting this exchange.”

    and

    “Please — you really ARE misinterpreting this thread and my comments.”

    and

    “…you have misinterpreted my attempt…”

    If — and I’m just speculating here — you were to add a personal rule such as “After someone tells me that I am misunderstanding them X times, I must re-examine that exchange from the beginning with that as an operating assumption.” what value for X do you think would be appropriate?

  36. Re: STD testing as a safe sex method?

    “Okay, you are just completely misunderstanding me…”

    I don’t think so. That is to say, I understand what you are saying (and it all sounds very exciting, I’m sure), I’m just refusing to allow you to attribute its genesis to me, or its relation to what I’ve written.

    If you prefer, think of it this way:

    Given: “I tend to be fairly literal…” to describe your approach to this thread, how do you LITERALLY interpret the following statements:

    “I suspect you are misinterpreting this exchange.”

    and

    “Please — you really ARE misinterpreting this thread and my comments.”

    and

    “…you have misinterpreted my attempt…”

    If — and I’m just speculating here — you were to add a personal rule such as “After someone tells me that I am misunderstanding them X times, I must re-examine that exchange from the beginning with that as an operating assumption.” what value for X do you think would be appropriate?

  37. Awesome!

    One qx though: how do I actually download the LJ icons so I can use ’em? Clicking on ’em does nada for me. Thx!

  38. Awesome!

    One qx though: how do I actually download the LJ icons so I can use ’em? Clicking on ’em does nada for me. Thx!

  39. I think I really want to watch YOU watching Prometheus. That’s what I want to see. If I can’t be there, film it for me? 🙂

  40. I think I really want to watch YOU watching Prometheus. That’s what I want to see. If I can’t be there, film it for me? 🙂

  41. Divorce

    “Now, of course, if folks were to say things like that, they’d rightly be considered barking mad.”

    I think there are many Christians who would be happy to see a stricter stance on divorce; just ask a Catholic (or me).

    Many of us are aware of the hypocrisy. I agree with you that this undermines our credibility. Christians speak of keeping marriage sacred, whilst we go about soiling it ourselves. This is one reason why I am, at my most conservative, apathetic about the gay marriage debate. On my liberal days I’m in favor of gay marriage, and on my libertarian days in favor of getting government out of marriage entirely. Churches can decide who they will and will not give a marriage blessing to; there’s not a whole lot of reason for us to pressure the government to select what contract two consenting adults can get in to. If there is a reason, then, in a secular society, we must make that argument outside of religion as best we can. Christianity ought not change things from the top down, but, if we are to influence a culture, it must be from the bottom up. And hopefully with love rather than hate.

    I also don’t understand why people can’t disagree civilly. I think gay acts are sin; I also think many things I do, even habitually, are sin. The stigma around gay folks makes no sense to me, since being gay does not remove the dignity of an instance of humankind any more than my sins remove my humanity.

  42. Divorce

    “Now, of course, if folks were to say things like that, they’d rightly be considered barking mad.”

    I think there are many Christians who would be happy to see a stricter stance on divorce; just ask a Catholic (or me).

    Many of us are aware of the hypocrisy. I agree with you that this undermines our credibility. Christians speak of keeping marriage sacred, whilst we go about soiling it ourselves. This is one reason why I am, at my most conservative, apathetic about the gay marriage debate. On my liberal days I’m in favor of gay marriage, and on my libertarian days in favor of getting government out of marriage entirely. Churches can decide who they will and will not give a marriage blessing to; there’s not a whole lot of reason for us to pressure the government to select what contract two consenting adults can get in to. If there is a reason, then, in a secular society, we must make that argument outside of religion as best we can. Christianity ought not change things from the top down, but, if we are to influence a culture, it must be from the bottom up. And hopefully with love rather than hate.

    I also don’t understand why people can’t disagree civilly. I think gay acts are sin; I also think many things I do, even habitually, are sin. The stigma around gay folks makes no sense to me, since being gay does not remove the dignity of an instance of humankind any more than my sins remove my humanity.

  43. Epic poetry.

    This was lovely. I didn’t realize what my dad had been talking about when he complained about death threats against Romney, and now I am sort of chuckling to myself. The best the wealthy white Christian GOP candidate can do for death threats is a bunch of snarky Lovecraft jokes. Cry this Obama voter a fricking river the color of fear and shadow.

  44. Epic poetry.

    This was lovely. I didn’t realize what my dad had been talking about when he complained about death threats against Romney, and now I am sort of chuckling to myself. The best the wealthy white Christian GOP candidate can do for death threats is a bunch of snarky Lovecraft jokes. Cry this Obama voter a fricking river the color of fear and shadow.

  45. Thin belts are also highly effective and add a fantasy of corporal punishment. I found the rope difficult as a do it yourself-er, but do you have any ideas about how it could be done.

  46. Thin belts are also highly effective and add a fantasy of corporal punishment. I found the rope difficult as a do it yourself-er, but do you have any ideas about how it could be done.

  47. So, trying this out and having issue with rope length in the instructions. You said 10 feet is enough? There’s is no way I could pull this off with much less than 20 feet. I’ve got 3 6 foot ropes tied together and still don’t have enough rope, and I’m a small to average sized frame.. Just thought maybe you should change that part cause for newbies like me that buy short rope thinking that it’ll work.. It’s a bit annoying.

    Otherwise loving your instructions, very clear steps!

  48. So, trying this out and having issue with rope length in the instructions. You said 10 feet is enough? There’s is no way I could pull this off with much less than 20 feet. I’ve got 3 6 foot ropes tied together and still don’t have enough rope, and I’m a small to average sized frame.. Just thought maybe you should change that part cause for newbies like me that buy short rope thinking that it’ll work.. It’s a bit annoying.

    Otherwise loving your instructions, very clear steps!

  49. Shinju in Torrance CA

    I think it always better to start with longer thicker ropes. Thinner ropes can be more damaging to your partner if they are too tight. Also a longer rope is more forgiving no it is more difficult to use. It is easier and better to cut down a long road then it is to knot together shorter ones.

    Unfortunately for me it has been difficult to find good subjects / partnerss here in Torrance California.

    DR
    drleisy@gmail.com

  50. Shinju in Torrance CA

    I think it always better to start with longer thicker ropes. Thinner ropes can be more damaging to your partner if they are too tight. Also a longer rope is more forgiving no it is more difficult to use. It is easier and better to cut down a long road then it is to knot together shorter ones.

    Unfortunately for me it has been difficult to find good subjects / partnerss here in Torrance California.

    DR
    drleisy@gmail.com

  51. Love this one

    I’ve used this on two girlfriends and they both loved it. I’m starting to use the variations next. Thanks for showing the clear procedure with photos.

  52. Love this one

    I’ve used this on two girlfriends and they both loved it. I’m starting to use the variations next. Thanks for showing the clear procedure with photos.

  53. Pingback: Top 8 How To Tie Tits - Thư Viện Hỏi Đáp

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